Philosophy

Any person who desires assistance is welcome. Aboriginal culture and teachings are the foundation of our programs and services.

We offer self-development programs and counselling services within a cultural framework that has proven to be comfortable and acceptable to Aboriginal people. Traditional people have been a fundamental part of the Circle Project since its beginning. They guide us and work with any person who needs their help.

The Circle Project has engaged in needs assessment activities on a regular and ongoing basis for a number of years. This goes back to the origins of the Circle Project where a community consultation was held to determine needs in the Aboriginal community and develop strategies to address those needs.

One of the most effective tools for helping us identify need is our presence and participation in the community. We host celebrations, such as National Aboriginal Day and our Elder’s Christmas party. We maintain a drop-in area for anyone who needs a friendly face and sympathetic ear. We listen to and engage with community members. We hear and see the struggles they face every day, from the mothers who can’t find or afford childcare, to the men who have lost self-confidence because they can’t get job interviews.

Because we work in the community and for the community and we have earned the community’s trust and respect. Individuals share their stories and they feel safe in sharing with us. Daycare parents continually provide information and share their challenges as well.

We use this informal gathering of information to identify real issues that people are facing, so that we can respond to the needs of the community and to pay attention to emerging issues that will impact the community.